How to Use Facebook to Win Fans

By claire |

wwwtibethouseorg

Facebook has millions of subscribers.  It has reached international ubiquity, and is has a huge potential  market for whomever puts in enough effort to stand out. But how exactly do you reach people on Facebook? What are the ground rules to follow to keep your fans?

There are several ways to reach out to clients on Facebook. The most unpractical one became the easiest way to do it. It went from “half-baked group with fewer capabilities” to “almost full-blown profile page-like” point of presence.

The answer is: create a fan page !

This is the easiest way to reach people online. The problem is, you cannot go outside and ask people to be your friend, as if you had a profile. You have to wait for them to get to you. But first, how should you create your pages?

If you have a really recognized brand, and a few “blockbuster” products, feel free to create different pages for each of these products. For example, one fan might love M&M’s, but not Snickers bars. Having only one “Mars” page would not make sense in that case. Plus, if you have big products that don’t have pages, you run the risk of individuals creating fan pages named after your product, in which case you will not be able to control it.

There is only one way to get this spot back: kindly ask (no Cease & Desist here) them if they could transfer you the ownership of the page, so you can keep everyone updated with awesome news and updates about your product. In most cases, people will happily transfer ownership (after all, they’re fans too). It is not failsafe: this is why, as soon as one of your product might become huge, you should create a fan page. If your product is or becomes well known, people will join.

Now there is the problem of how to create page without a personal account. One could create a profile named after the company. This is a spreading technique strictly forbidden by Facebook, and you risk getting your account terminated. There is one proper way of creating this is going through these steps:

Go to http://www.facebook.com/pages/create.php. Choose the right section, your name, and press Create. You will be taken to a sign up for Facebook page. If you already have a personal account DO NOT USE IT! Use your company e-mail or create a specific one for that purpose. The next step is to validate your registration following the link in your mailbox. Voilà, you have your own Facebook Fan Page! Now you can start to edit it.

So, how and how often should you update your page? The answer is: try to spread the updates as much as possible.  There are several studies on it and some of them think that posting at 4:01PM is the best time for the highest exposure (this is not a joke). If you have several updates to do (uploading videos, adding pictures), it is okay to have 2 of them in a row, 3 maximum. Anything over 5 and all your updates except one will disappear and add a “SHOW x MORE POSTS” link on the user’s homepage, resulting in two things:

  • People will “unfan” you because you’re flooding their homepage;
  • You will lose a lot of exposure since all your posts vanished under that banner.

To sum up, here’s a quick list of things to do and things to avoid:

  • DO have fan pages for all your products, if they are influential enough.
  • DO add enough content to your page so people want to subscribe to it.
  • DO NOT update 10 times in a row; people will unfan you as fast as they added you.
  • DO NOT create a profile for the company to get a fan page: this will get you banned from Facebook.
  • DO add a link to the page on your website; Facebook will even offer buttons to insert directly to your homepage.

Hopefully this post gave you better insight on the matter of getting people to know you through Facebook!

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